Information

About

Discipline is a Melbourne-based publisher and contemporary art journal edited by Nicholas Croggon, David Homewood, and Helen Hughes. It has a focus on longer, research-based essays, interviews and artist pages.

While based and published in Melbourne, the writers and artists who have contributed to Discipline are both local and international. In presenting longer-form essays, the journal aims to ground a new body of sustained intellectual writing about contemporary art that does not merely fall back on the crutch of “plurality” as a means for theorising art after postmodernism and globalisation.

Discipline aims to publish highly focused essays that take on, critically and intelligently, the full strength of contemporary artworks, working through their specific concepts, histories, politics and materialities.

Contact

info@discipline.net.au

Distribution

All online payments are processed through PayPal (no account required) and we accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, or PayPal. For ordering enquires please write to order@discipline.net.au

Social Networks

Facebook
Twitter (@discipline_au)
Instagram (@disci_pline)

Newsletter

To subscribe to our newsletter please enter your email address below:


Colophon

Editors

Nicholas Croggon
David Homewood
Helen Hughes

Guest Editors

Vivian Ziherl (Discipline No. 1)
Maria Fusco (Discipline No. 2)
Raimundas Malašauskas (Discipline No. 3)

Design

Warren Taylor (2011)
Annie Wu & Žiga Testen (2012–2013)
Robert Milne, Rainoff (2014–)

Typeface

Victor, Fabian Harb (2014)

Contributors

Discipline No. 1

An Paenhuysen, Annie Wu, Ash Kilmartin, Ben Kinmont, Bianca Hester, Charlie Sofo, Christian Thompson, Connal Parsley, Damiano Bertoli, David Homewood, Fayen d’Evie, Francis Plagne, Graham Lambkin, Helen Hughes, Helen Johnson, Helen Johnson, Jackson Slattery, Jessica McElhinney, Joaquin Segura, John Nixon, Joshua Petherick, Liang Luscombe & Patrice Sharkey, Marco Fusinato, Matthew Collings, Matthew Griffin, Matthew Lutz-Kinoy, Michael Ashcroft, Mira Gojak, Nicholas Croggon, Nine Yamamoto-Masson, Pataphysics, Pat Foster and Jen Berean, Raafat Ishak, Rebecca Cleman, S.T. Lore, Sarinah Masukor, Slave Pianos, Sriwhana Spong, Stuart Ringholt, Thomas Jeppe, Tom Nicholson, Vivian Ziherl, Warren Taylor, Wolfgang Muller, Yanni Florence

Discipline No. 2

A Constructed World, Adrian Martin, Alex Martinis Roe, Amelia Barikin, Annie Wu, Ash Keating, Bianca Hester, Callum Morton, Christopher LG Hill, Connal Parsley, David Homewood, Elizabeth Newman, Emanuele Coccia, Emily Floyd, Francis Plagne, Helen Hughes, Helen Johnson, James Parker, Janet Burchill, Jemima Wyman, John Berger, John Bevis, Kate Meakin, Kate Warren, Kimberley Dinosaur Tracks, Lip, Maria Fusco, Matt Hinkley, Mira Gojak, Moira Roth, Nicholas Croggon, Nikolaus Gansterer, Nikos Papastergiadis, Omer Fast, Paul Knight, Raquel Ormella, Regrette Etcetera, Robert Rooney, Rongsolo, S.T. Lore, Sandra Selig, Sarinah Masukor, Simon Klose, Simon Reynolds, Steve Salisbury, Terry Smith, Tim Alves, Timothy Morton, Vernon Ah Kee, Vivian Ziherl, Yukultji Napangati, Yve Lomax, Žiga Testen

Discipline No. 3

A Constructed World, Adrian Martin, Alex Vivian, Alicia Frankovich, Anastasia Klose, Andrew McLellan, Angie Keefer, Annie Wu, Anusha Kenny, Ava Carrère, Brook Andrew, Claire Lambe, Dale Hickey, Dan Arps, David Homewood, David Wlazlo, Edith Scob, Elena Narbutaite, Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano, Geoff Newton, Géraldine Longueville, Hany Armanious, Harriet Morgan, Helen Hughes, Helen Johnson, Huw Hallam, Ian Burn, Jan Bryant, Joel Stern, John Nixon, Joris Kritis and Julie Peeters, Juliet Rogers, Justin Andrews, Justin Clemens, Kate Smith, Lauren Berkowitz, Lauren Bliss, Lisa Radford, Maggie Finch, Mattin, Mark Geffriaud, Narelle Jubelin and Jacky Redgate, Nathan Gray, Nicholas Croggon, Nick Selenitsch, Nikos Papastergiadis, Nyapanyapa Yunupingu, Patrick Pound, Quentin Sprague, Raimundas Malašauskas, Rex Butler, Rob McLeish, Simryn Gill, S.T. Lore, Terry Smith, The Mulka Project, Valentina Desideri, Žiga Testen, Zoë Croggon

Issues
2013
Discipline No. 3
Discipline_3

Edited by Nicholas Croggon & Helen Hughes with a guest edited section by Raimundas Malašauskas, design by Annie Wu & Žiga Testen.

Contents

Cover

Nyapanyapa Yunupingu

Inside Covers

Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano
(artist pages)

2–3

Nick Selenitsch
(artist pages)

5

Introduction: Too Much, Not Enough by Nicholas Croggon and Helen Hughes

7

The Obscurity of the Present… by Jan Bryant

19–22

Justin Andrews
(artist pages)

23

Contemporary Art as Minimal Domination by Justin Clemens

19–22

Claire Lambe
(artist pages)

33

John Nixon: A Communist Artist by Rex Butler

41–44

Alicia Frankovich
(artist pages)

45

A Love for the Fallen: A Melancholic Relation to the Art of September 11, 2001 by Juliet Rogers

53–58

Patrick Pound
(artist pages)

59

White Lines: The Recent Work of Nyapanyapa Yunupingu by Quentin Sprague

53–58

Kate Smith
(artist pages)

73

Lend Me Your Ear: On Hany Armanious’s Fountain (2012) by Helen Johnson

77–80

Narelle Jubelin and Jacky Redgate
(artist pages)

81

Simryn Gill: Questions of Coherence, Knowledge and Information by Maggie Finch

95–103

The Mulka Project
(artist pages)

104

Still Searching: Time in the Work of Anastasia Klose by Anusha Kenny

113–116

Lauren Berkowitz
(artist pages)

117

A Love Story: A Constructed World, Speech and What Archive, The Telepathy Project by Lauren Bliss

125–128

Nathan Gray
(artist pages)

129

Geoff Newton: Fan Tribute History Parallel Bootleg Paintings (or: Career Paths are Not the Same as Songlines) by Lisa Radford

140–144

Harriet Morgan
(artist pages)

145

Notching Up the Imaginary: Film, Art and the Support-Surface by Adrian Martin

153–156

Rob McLeish
(artist pages)

157

Return to Disorder: Dale Hickey’s Passage from Conceptual Art to the Cup paintings (1972–73) by David Homewood

167–170

Dan Arps
(artist pages)

171

The Austrian Question: Ian Burn and Institutional Misrecognition by David Wlazlo

187–190

Zoë Croggon
(artist pages)

176

What is Not Music? An Interview with Mattin by Joel Stern and Andrew McLellan

191

Contemporary Art and Contemporaneity: Reflections on Method, Review of Reviews (Part 1) by Terry Smith

201–204

Brook Andrew
(artist pages)

205

Cosmopolitan Imaginings. Review: Nikos Papastergiadis, Cosmopolitanism and Culture by Huw Hallam

214

The Bomb and the Still Life: Strategies to Secure the Present Moment by S.T. Lore

242

Contributors

Back Cover

Alex Vivian
(artist page)

Guess edited section by Raimundas Malašauskas (loose insert)

Interview with Edith Scob by Raimundas Malašauskas, Valentina Desideri, Mark Geffriaud and Géraldine Longueville, designed by Joris Kritis and Julie Peeters

244 pages, 230 × 300 mm, Softcover, Full Colour, Edition of 1000, 2013, ISSN: 1839-082X

$30.00 + postage to…

2012
Discipline No. 2
Discipline_2

Edited by Nicholas Croggon & Helen Hughes with a guest edited section by Maria Fusco and design by Annie Wu & Žiga Testen.

Contents

Cover

Matt Hinkley

1–6

A Constructed World
(artist pages)

8

Editorial: The Contemporary Artworld by Nicholas Croggon and Helen Hughes

10–12

Elizabeth Newman
(artist pages)

13

End of Love by Emanuele Coccia, translated by Connal Parsley

16–17

Sandra Selig
(artist pages)

18

Time Shrines: Melancholia and Mourning in the Work of Ash Keating by Amelia Barikin

25

Matt Hinkley and the Embedded Mark by Francis Plagne

35

Aestheticising Architecture / Architecturalising Aesthetics: Callum Morton and Bianca Hester by Helen Hughes

49–51

Kate Meakin
(artist pages)

52

Yukultji Napangati: Occupying Dreaming by Timothy Morton

59

A Moment An Immeasurable Whole (on Mira Gojak) by Helen Johnson

Guess edited section by Maria Fusco (insert)

Editorial: The Human Word is Midway Between the Muteness of Animals and the Silence of God by Maria Fusco

The Hand & The Creature by Nikolaus Gansterer and Moira Roth

Why Look at Animals? by John Berger

A Philosopher, A Cat, A Monkey and Nudity by Yve Lomax

Mnemonics for Bird Songs and Calls by John Bevis

The Hand, The Creatures & The Singing Garden by Nikolaus Gansterer and Moira Roth

97

RR / SK: Public Exhibition by David Homewood

106

Kimberley Dinosaur Tracks by Steve Salisbury

110

Unstable Realities in Omer Fast’s Five Thousand Feet Is The Best by Kate Warren

120

Price Tag by Adrian Martin

124–125

Rongsolo
(artist pages)

126

Recommended Reading: LIP Magazine (1976–1984) by Vivian Ziherl

137–140

Christopher LG Hill
(artist pages)

141

The Telling Moment Revisited: Vernon Ah Kee’s Tall Man by Tim Alves

146

All The News That’s Fit To Sing: Vernon Ah Kee’s Tall Man by Sarinah Masukor

150

Can There Be a History of Contemporary Art? (Terry Smith’s What is Contemporary Art?, 2009, Terry Smith’s Contemporary Art: World Currents, 2011) by Nikos Papastergiadis

156

Retromania and the Atemporality of Contemporary Pop (Simon Reynolds’s Retromania: Pop Culture’s Addiction to its Own Past, 2011) by James Parker

165–168

Paul Knight
(artist pages)

169

Watts’ Tale Of Endless Ore Chapter II — Escape and the Advice of Zola. by S.T. Lore

191

Contributors

Poster Insert

Janet Burchill

192 pages, 230 × 300 mm, Softcover, Full Colour, Edition of 1000, 2012, ISSN: 1839-082X

$25.00 + postage to…

2011
Discipline No. 1
Discipline_1

Edited by Nicholas Croggon & Helen Hughes with a guest edited section by Vivian Ziherl and design by Warren Taylor.

Contents

Cover

Damiano Bertoli

1–7

Stuart Ringholt
(artist pages)

8–13

Helen Johnson
(artist pages)

15

Editorial: Discipline and Publish by Nicholas Croggon and Helen Hughes

16

Contributors

17

Mira Gojak
(artist page)

18

Salon des Independents: John Nixon as Curator and Publisher in the 1980s by Francis Plagne

24

When Cracks Appear … Pat Foster and Jen Berean and Broken Windows by Fayen d’Evie

29

‘Are you Serial?’ On Marco Fusinato’s recent work by David Homewood

34

Christian Thompson and the Art of Indigeneity by Connal Parsley

38–39

Annie Wu
(artist pages)

40

Sympathies and Antagonisms: on Bianca Hester’s Please leave these windows open over night to enable the fans to draw in cool air during the early hours of the morning by Liang Luscombe & Patrice Sharkey

45

Charlie Sofo
(artist page)

46

Deceive, Inveigle & Obfuscate: An Interview with Joaquin Segura by Thomas Jeppe

50

Review: Hotel Theory by Ash Kilmartin

54

Questionnaire: Yanni Florence on Pataphysics Magazine

58–59

Sriwhana Spong
(artist pages)

60–61

Jackson Slattery
(artist pages)

62–63

Matthew Griffin
(artist pages)

64

Stroking Rough Minutes into Smooth Hours: A Short History of the Music of Graham Lambkin by Nicholas Croggon

69–72

Joshua Petherick
(artist pages)

73

Editorial: Corridor by Vivian Ziherl

74

Flickering Hyperpresence: A Conversation with Wolfgang Muller and An Paenhuysen by Nine Yamamoto-Masson

78–87

Matthew Lutz-Kinoy
(artist pages)

88

An Interview with Ben Kinmont by Vivian Ziherl

92

Lean-to, Just so … by Rebecca Cleman

94

Proposition for a Banner March and Black Cube Hot Air Balloon: An Interview with Raafat Ishak and Tom Nicholson

100

Conservative Art Criticism? Matthew Collings on Contemporary Art by Michael Ashcroft

102

Review: Christoph Mencke, Daniel Loick, Isabelle Graw, The Power of Judgment: A Debate on Aesthetic Critique by Helen Johnson

104

Review: Michael Fried, Why Photography Matters as Art as Never Before by Sarinah Masukor

106

Watts’ Tale Of Endless Ore by S.T. Lore

108–109

Jessica McElhinney
(artist pages)

110–112

The Girft–Redaction and Decontamination by Slave Pianos

112 pages, 218 × 300 mm, Softcover, Full Colour, Edition of 1000, 2011, ISSN: 1839-082X

$15.00 + postage to…

Publications
Forthcoming
Three Reflections on
Contemporary Art History

Edited by Nicholas Croggon & Helen Hughes, essays by Ian McLean, Amelia Barikin, and Terry Smith.

Three Reflections on Contemporary Art History is the first in a series of publications edited and published by Discipline, the annually published contem­­porary art journal, based in Melbourne, Australia.

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This publication, edited by Nicholas Croggon and Helen Hughes, focuses Discipline’s interest in contemporary art onto the practice of art history itself, including essays by three of the discipline’s leading practitioners: Ian McLean, Amelia Barikin, and Terry Smith. In their essays, McLean, Barikin and Smith reflect on the stakes of a properly contemporary art history: its semantic precursors and philosophical potential, its link to the undead, and ultimately, its necessity.

Available in paperback and eBook editions.

 

2012
S.T. Lore
Institute Zagreb 1986/The Air Of Conquerors

Designed by Annie Wu with images by Joshua Petherick and Nicholas Mangan.

Institute Zagreb 1986/The Air of Conquerors are two new novella-length works of fiction by the Melbourne-based writer S.T. Lore that are presented in a flip novel. The book is the first solo publication by Lore, featuring stories that pivot around characters immersed in scenes of claustrophobia, obsessive archiving, impossible architectures, image-saturation and delusion.

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Institute Zagreb 1986 intertwines two narratives about a religion conceived by a pair of demographic analysts on the rooftop of an abandoned building, and a rock-collecting character named The Saxon. The narrative is collated through a process of uncovering archived audio recordings retained by an ʻexplosion proofʼ telephone. Institute Zagreb 1986 is interspersed with a series of graphic elements created for the publication by Joshua Petherick. The Air of Conquerors is a piece of surreal detective fiction set against a backdrop of the South Australian Desert scattered with ruined Parisian monuments. It chronicles two investigatorsʼ search for a lonely telephone operator who has disappeared into a subterranean hotel. The narrative was written in reference to a series of photographs that were taken by Nicholas Mangan in Paris in November 2011 and sent to the author as part of a project exploring the fictionalisation of images — both historical and the everyday.

Since 2009, Lore has written fictional texts to accompany a number of exhibitions by Melbourne-based artists and curators, including: Christopher LG Hill, Dylan Martorell, Liv Barrett, Nathan Gray, Alex Vivian, Marco Fusinato, A Constructed World/Speech & What Archive, James Deutsher, Gambia Castle/The Reader, Joint Hassles/Harriet Morgan, Helen Hughes, Genevieve Osborn, and Nicholas Mangan. He is also a regular contributor to the Melbourne-based contemporary art journal Discipline, in which he is publishing the serialised novel, Watts’ Tale of Endless Ore — one chapter per issue.

208 pages, 120 × 177 mm, Softcover, B/W, Edition of 1000, ISBN: 978-0-646-57919-1

$20.00 + postage to…

Editions
2014
Discipline Calendar
Discipine_ELP_Calendar_2014_2015

Compiled by Nicholas Croggon, David Homewood and Helen Hughes, designed by Robert Milne and typeset in Churchward Marianna by Joseph Churchward.

Discipline Calendar has been produced as our contribution to Christopher LG Hill’s “Endless Lonely Planet,” Vol. 3, 2014 and includes a selection of Discipline contributors’ birthdays. Calendar dates are from April, 2014 – May, 2015.

A1 poster, 594 × 841 mm (210 × 297mm folded), B/W, Edition of 200

$5.00 + postage to…

2013
We Need Some
Discipline in Here
Discipline_Tote_Bag_2

Designed by James Vinciguerra.
Tote Bag, Edition of 70

Sold Out

Discipline Height Chart
Discipline_ELP_Height_Chart

Compiled by Nicholas Croggon and Helen Hughes, designed by Annie Wu.

Discipline Height Chart has been produced as our contribution to Christopher LG Hill’s “Endless Lonely Planet,” Vol. 2, 2013 and includes a selection of Discipline contributors’ heights.

Foldout poster, 210 × 600 mm, 2 colour, Edition of 500

$5.00 + postage to…

2012
Discipline Contemporary Art Journal Tote Bag
Discipline_Tote_Bag_1

Designed by James Vinciguerra.
Tote Bag, Edition of 50

Sold Out

Discipline A–Z
Discipline_ELP_Alphabet
Compiled by Nicholas Croggon and Helen Hughes, designed by James Grant.

Discipline A–Z has been produced as our contribution to Christopher LG Hill’s “Endless Lonely Planet,” Vol. 1, 2012 and includes letters designed by a selection of Discipline contributors that form a full English alphabet. The letters have been contributed by Sean Bailey, Damiano Bertoli, Matthew Brown, Bazzy Ellison, Fayen d’Evie, James Grant, Nathan Gray, Christopher LG Hill, Helen Hughes, Renee Jaeger, Helen Johnson, Madeline Kidd, Claire Lambe, Dylan Martorell, Jessica McElhinney, Elizabeth Newman, John Nixon, Virginia Overell, Mark Rodda, Antonia Sellbach, Kate Smith, Masato Takasaka, Simon Taylor, Paul Williams, Annie Wu, and Jarrod Zlatic.

Foldout poster, 297 × 420 mm, 2 colour, Edition of 100

$5.00 + postage to…

Information

About

Discipline is a Melbourne-based publisher and contemporary art journal edited by Nicholas Croggon, David Homewood, and Helen Hughes. It has a focus on longer, research-based essays, interviews and artist pages.

While based and published in Melbourne, the writers and artists who have contributed to Discipline are both local and international. In presenting longer-form essays, the journal aims to ground a new body of sustained intellectual writing about contemporary art that does not merely fall back on the crutch of “plurality” as a means for theorising art after postmodernism and globalisation.

Discipline aims to publish highly focused essays that take on, critically and intelligently, the full strength of contemporary artworks, working through their specific concepts, histories, politics and materialities.

Contact

info@discipline.net.au

Distribution

All online payments are processed through PayPal (no account required) and we accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, or PayPal. For ordering enquires please write to order@discipline.net.au

Social Networks

Facebook
Twitter (@discipline_au)
Instagram (@disci_pline)

Newsletter

To subscribe to our newsletter please enter your email address below:


Colophon

Editors

Nicholas Croggon
David Homewood
Helen Hughes

Guest Editors

Vivian Ziherl (Discipline No. 1)
Maria Fusco (Discipline No. 2)
Raimundas Malašauskas (Discipline No. 3)

Design

Warren Taylor (2011)
Annie Wu & Žiga Testen (2012–2013)
Robert Milne, Rainoff (2014–)

Typeface

Victor, Fabian Harb (2014)

Contributors

Discipline No. 1

An Paenhuysen, Annie Wu, Ash Kilmartin, Ben Kinmont, Bianca Hester, Charlie Sofo, Christian Thompson, Connal Parsley, Damiano Bertoli, David Homewood, Fayen d’Evie, Francis Plagne, Graham Lambkin, Helen Hughes, Helen Johnson, Helen Johnson, Jackson Slattery, Jessica McElhinney, Joaquin Segura, John Nixon, Joshua Petherick, Liang Luscombe & Patrice Sharkey, Marco Fusinato, Matthew Collings, Matthew Griffin, Matthew Lutz-Kinoy, Michael Ashcroft, Mira Gojak, Nicholas Croggon, Nine Yamamoto-Masson, Pataphysics, Pat Foster and Jen Berean, Raafat Ishak, Rebecca Cleman, S.T. Lore, Sarinah Masukor, Slave Pianos, Sriwhana Spong, Stuart Ringholt, Thomas Jeppe, Tom Nicholson, Vivian Ziherl, Warren Taylor, Wolfgang Muller, Yanni Florence

Discipline No. 2

A Constructed World, Adrian Martin, Alex Martinis Roe, Amelia Barikin, Annie Wu, Ash Keating, Bianca Hester, Callum Morton, Christopher LG Hill, Connal Parsley, David Homewood, Elizabeth Newman, Emanuele Coccia, Emily Floyd, Francis Plagne, Helen Hughes, Helen Johnson, James Parker, Janet Burchill, Jemima Wyman, John Berger, John Bevis, Kate Meakin, Kate Warren, Kimberley Dinosaur Tracks, Lip, Maria Fusco, Matt Hinkley, Mira Gojak, Moira Roth, Nicholas Croggon, Nikolaus Gansterer, Nikos Papastergiadis, Omer Fast, Paul Knight, Raquel Ormella, Regrette Etcetera, Robert Rooney, Rongsolo, S.T. Lore, Sandra Selig, Sarinah Masukor, Simon Klose, Simon Reynolds, Steve Salisbury, Terry Smith, Tim Alves, Timothy Morton, Vernon Ah Kee, Vivian Ziherl, Yukultji Napangati, Yve Lomax, Žiga Testen

Discipline No. 3

A Constructed World, Adrian Martin, Alex Vivian, Alicia Frankovich, Anastasia Klose, Andrew McLellan, Angie Keefer, Annie Wu, Anusha Kenny, Ava Carrère, Brook Andrew, Claire Lambe, Dale Hickey, Dan Arps, David Homewood, David Wlazlo, Edith Scob, Elena Narbutaite, Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano, Geoff Newton, Géraldine Longueville, Hany Armanious, Harriet Morgan, Helen Hughes, Helen Johnson, Huw Hallam, Ian Burn, Jan Bryant, Joel Stern, John Nixon, Joris Kritis and Julie Peeters, Juliet Rogers, Justin Andrews, Justin Clemens, Kate Smith, Lauren Berkowitz, Lauren Bliss, Lisa Radford, Maggie Finch, Mattin, Mark Geffriaud, Narelle Jubelin and Jacky Redgate, Nathan Gray, Nicholas Croggon, Nick Selenitsch, Nikos Papastergiadis, Nyapanyapa Yunupingu, Patrick Pound, Quentin Sprague, Raimundas Malašauskas, Rex Butler, Rob McLeish, Simryn Gill, S.T. Lore, Terry Smith, The Mulka Project, Valentina Desideri, Žiga Testen, Zoë Croggon

Lectures
Forthcoming
Public Meeting:
Weak Signals/Low Batteries

Friday, 19th December 2014, 10:30am
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne

Saturday, 20th December 2014, 2:00pm
Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane

Gertrude Contemporary, the Institute of Modern Art, Landings and Discipline co-present Public Meeting: Weak Signals/Low Batteries — a screening of the Karrabing Film Collective’s When the Dogs Talked (2014) accompanied by a discussion.

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The Karrabing Film Collective’s short feature film When the Dogs Talked blends documentary and fictional modes to track the lives of the people that made it. As the film shows, finding ways to live life can be exhausting — we often run out of batteries. The film offers at least one way in which a group of people might charge these up again. But where can the film itself find a place? Is the rapaciously expansive world of contemporary art such a place? Can the abstract globality of contemporary art be brought back to earth?

Led by Landings and Discipline, these two public meetings, one in Melbourne and one in Brisbane, will bring diverse voices to bear upon the film’s semi-fictional account of life across urban dwelling and Aboriginal homeland, questioning how choices can be made amid the incommensurable conditions of settler-colonial politics.

Key invited guests will structure a ‘plenum’ in which the voices of members of the public will be facilitated to join in. Guests will include: members of the Karrabing Film Collective, including Linda Yarrowin and Trevor Bianamu; Elizabeth Povinelli, Columbia University, New York; Nikos Papastergiadis, University of Melbourne; Denise Ferreira da Silva, Queen Mary University, London; Julieta Aranda, artist and editor, e-flux journal; Rachel O’Reilly, critic, poet and editor; Tom Nicholson, artist; and Richard Bell, artist (Brisbane only).

Co-presented by Gertrude Contemporary, the Institute of Modern Art, Landings and Discipline.

2014
Mari Spirito, Övül Durmusoglu, Basak Senova and November Paynter
Inside Outside & In Parallel: Speculations From Four Curators Working in the Turkish Context

Wednesday, 29th October 2014, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

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The next Gertrude-Discipline lecture takes the form of a panel: a discussion between four curators whose work concerns the presentation and production of contemporary art from Turkey. Mari Spirito, Övül Durmusoglu, Basak Senova and November Paynter represent a range of voices from within the independent, not-for-profit and museum sectors in Turkey. They will discuss their approaches to curating contemporary Turkish art, highlighting the individual concerns, challenges and circumstances that motivate and inform their curatorial approaches.

Following the panel discussion, Associate Professor and Director of Curatorial Practise at Monash University and Editor at-large for The Exhibitionist, Tara McDowell, will facilitate a Q&A with the audience. 

Mari Spirito is the Founding Director of Protocinema, a nonprofit realising transnational, site-aware exhibitions around the world, based in Istanbul. Protocinema recently presented Diner Noire, with Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster and Tristan Bera in Istanbul; early work by Gerard Byrne in a former Chinese deli in New York; and new work by Ahmet Ögüt in New York in partnership with Itinerant. Spirito served as an Advisor to the 2nd Mardin Biennial, Turkey (2012). Prior to founding Protocinema, she was Director of 303 Gallery in New York for 12 years, where she worked on large-scale, site-specific works by Mike Nelson and Doug Aitken. She holds a BFA from Massachusetts College of Art, Boston. Spirito is a Consultant for Art Basel’s Conversation and Salons, and is on the boards of Participant Inc. and New Art Dealers Alliance in New York; and Collectorspace in Istanbul.

Övül Durmusoglu is a curator and writer based in Berlin and Istanbul. She completed an MFA in Visual Arts and Visual Communication Design at Sabanci University, Istanbul and participated in the Critical Studies program at Malmö Art Academy, Sweden (2005–06). In 2007, Durmusoglu was awarded the Premio Lorenzo Bonaldi Young Curators Award for her exhibition Data Recovery, GAMeC, Bergamo, and in 2010 she received a Rave Scholarship to work on a collaborative project of the Institute for Foreign Cultural Relations (ifa), Stuttgart and the Akademie Schloss Solitude, Stuttgart. In 2013, Durmusoglu curated the festival Sofia Contemporary. As a Goethe Institute Fellow at Maybe Education and Public Programs for dOCUMENTA (13), she organised the programs, What is Thinking? Or a Taste That Hates Itself; Readers Circle: 100 Notes – 100 Thoughts; and Paper Mornings: Book Presentations at dOCUMENTA (13). Durmusoglu has contributed to different catalogues, publications, and magazines such as Frieze d/e, Flash Art International, and …ment.

Basak Senova is a curator and designer. She studied literature and graphic design (MFA in Graphic Design and PhD in Art, Design and Architecture at Bilkent University) and attended the 7th Curatorial Training Programme of Stichting De Appel, Amsterdam. She has been writing on art, technology and media, initiating and developing projects and curating exhibitions since 1995. Senova is an editorial correspondent for ibraaz.org and one of the founding members of NOMAD, as well as the organizer of ctrl_alt_del and Upgrade!Istanbul. Senova was the curator of the Pavilion of Turkey at the 53rd Venice Biennale (2009). As an assistant professor, she has lectured at various universities in Istanbul, such as Kadir Has University, Bilgi University and Koç University. She co-curated UNCOVERED (Cyprus) and the 2nd Biennial of Contemporary Art, D-0 ARK Underground (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Senova is a member of the Advisory Boards of the Istanbul Biennial and D-0 ARK Underground, and of the Advisory Committee of Protocinema. She is the curator of the Helsinki Photography Biennial 2014, Jerusalem Show, and the Art Gallery Chair of SIGGRAPH 2014 (ACM), Vancouver.

November Paynter is Associate Director of Research and Programmes, SALT in Istanbul. She was previously Curator for Platform Garanti Contemporary Art Center 2002–2006, Assistant Curator of the 9th International Istanbul Biennial in 2005, and among other achievements was the 2003 recipient of the Premio Lorenza Bonaldi per L’arte – EnterPrize, as the first curator under the age of 30 to be recognised with this award. In 2007, Paynter was Consultant Curator at Tate Modern for the exhibition Global Cities and her recent independent curatorial projects include New Ends Old Beginnings at the Bluecoat and Open Eye galleries in Liverpool (2008); The columns held us up at Artists Space in New York (2009); and As the Land Expands at Al Riwaq Art Space in Bahrain (2010). Paynter also worked on 0 – Now: Traversing West Asia (co-curated with Russell Storer) for the 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Brisbane in 2011. Paynter writes for art periodicals including Artforum, Bidoun and ArtAsiaPacific, as well as for artist and exhibition publications.

Mari Spirito, Övül Durmusoglu, Basak Senova and November Paynter have been brought to Australia by Artspace, Sydney, in partnership with Protocinema, Istanbul, in the lead-up to the Australian-Turkish year of collaboration (2015). This curatorial research visit and public talk is generously supported and enabled by the Australia Council for the Arts and the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Presented by Gertrude Contemporary and Discipline in collaboration with Artspace and Protocinema.

James Parker
The Jurisprudence of
Sonic Warfare

Thursday, 11th September, 2014, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

World War 1 marked a watershed in the history of sonic warfare. Noise and war have always gone together, but never before had sound been so devastatingly weaponised. ‘Soldiers knew within hours on the Front,’ writes historian Hiller Schwartz, ‘that the Great War was noise, that the noise was dangerous, and if noise of itself was not fatal then it was advance notice, and emblem, of mortality.’

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How should we think the weaponisation of sound? And what, if anything, has law got to do with it? The ‘sonic booms’ over Nicaragua were raised in proceedings before the International Court of Justice, but made legally cognisable only as airspace violations. In legal terms, the LRAD is so readily available internationally precisely because it is presented as a ‘communication device’ rather than a ‘weapon’. Torture is in principle criminalised, but the invisibility of sound in ‘interrogation practices’ is invariably exploited in order to mask its violence, and the playlists in question (Britney, Metallica, Barney the Dinosaur) are far more likely to raise a chuckle than juridical concern. Is law capable of any sort of purchase here at all? Or is it in fact a part of the problem? What, in other words, is the jurisprudence of sonic warfare?

Dr James Parker is a lecturer at Melbourne Law School, where he is also director of the research program ‘Law, Sound and the International’ at the Institute for International Law and the Humanities. He is currently putting the finishing touches to a monograph – Acoustic Jurisprudence: Listening to the Trial of Simon Bikindi (Oxford University Press, forthcoming) – which considers the trial of Simon Bikindi, who was accused by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda of inciting genocide with his songs. James is also an active music critic and radio broadcaster. These days he does most of his music writing for Tiny Mix Tapes. Since 2011, he has presented a weekly radio show dedicated to experimental sounds on Melbourne’s PBS 106.7fm.

Lecture #3 in the series Theories and Histories of Sound presented in conjunction with Liquid Architecture and Gertrude Contemporary.

Terry Smith
World Art Now, The Provincialism Problem Then: 40 Years of Contemporary Art

Wednesday, 3rd September, 2014, 6:00pm
Clemenger BBDO Auditorium
The National Gallery of Victoria
Free to attend, although bookings are required

In this lecture, Smith will describe the circumstances of the writing of the article The Provincialism Problem, first published in New York magazine Artforum in September 1974. This article was among one of the first to question the concentration of modernist values in the artworld in cities such as New York, Paris, and London. The Provincial Problem has since been continously reprinted, and is frequently referred to by artists, critics, theorists and historians around the world, making it one of the most cited texts by an Australian writer on art.

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In this lecture Smith will trace the responses to the article up to the present day, including his own changes of mind. He will consider how the problems and possibilities identified in the 1970’s  have fared since then, and how world pictures changed during the shift from late modern to contemporary art.

Terry Smith, FAHA, CIHA, is Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Contemporary Art History and Theory in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at the University of Pittsburgh, and Distinguished Visiting Professor at the National Institute for Experimental Arts, College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales, Sydney. He is the 2010 winner of the Franklin Jewett Mather Award for art criticism conferred by the College Art Association (USA), and in 2011 received the Australia Council Visual Arts Laureate Award.

Smith is the author of a number of books, notably Making the Modern: Industry, Art and Design in America (University of Chicago Press, 1993); Transformations in Australian Art, volume 1The Nineteenth Century: Landscape, Colony and Nation, volume 2The Twentieth Century: Modernism and Aboriginality (Craftsman House, Sydney, 2002); The Architecture of Aftermath (University of Chicago Press, 2006), What is Contemporary Art? (University of Chicago Press, 2009), Contemporary Art: World Currents (London: Laurence King; Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice-Hall, 2011 and 2012), Thinking Contemporary Curating (New York: Independent Curators International, 2012), and Sodobna Umetnost in Sodobnos: Zbirka Esjeci [Contemporary Art and Contemporaneity: Collected Essays] (Ljubljana: SDLK, Slovensko drustvo likovnih kritikov [Slovenian Society of Critical Aesthetics], 2013).

Presented in conjunction with Gertrude Contemporary and the National Gallery of Victoria.

Documentation…

Watch the recording of Terry Smith’s lecture below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qY59e4xb25s

Douglas Kahn
Sound Matters: One Energy
Among Others

Thursday, 28th August, 2014, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

This exploratory talk will follow from Douglas Kahn’s most recent book, Earth Sound Earth Signal: Energies and Earth Magnitude in the Arts (University of California Press, 2013). The book, over a decade in the making, is a fundamental reworking in the histories of science, communications, music and the arts to account for the incursion of electromagnetism into culture from the nineteenth century to the present.

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It covers such figures as Thomas Watson, Henry David Thoreau, John Cage, Pauline Oliveros, Joyce Hinterding and Alvin Lucier, Kahn’s former teacher. Investigating the trade between acoustics and electromagnetism in aesthetics and the arts poses questions for new approaches in the arts, ecology and media where sound is but one energy among others.

Douglas Kahn is Professor of Media and Innovation and Australian Research Council Fellow at the National Institute for Experimental Arts, UNSW Art and Design, and formerly Professor of Science and Technology Studies at University of California at Davis. Kahn’s writings are central to the fields of sound studies, sound in the arts, media arts history and history of experimental music. His books include Noise Water Meat: A History of Sound in the Avant-garde (MIT Press, 1999), Wireless Imagination: Sound, Radio and the Avant-garde (MIT Press, 1992), Source: Music of the Avant-garde, 1966–1973 (University of California Press, 2011), Mainframe Experimentalism: Early Computing and the Foundations of the Digital Arts (University of California Press, 2012), and Earth Sound Earth Signal: Energies and Earth Magnitude in the Arts (University of California Press, 2013). His current project is A Natural History of Media.

Lecture #2 in the series Theories and Histories of Sound presented in conjunction with Liquid Architecture and Gertrude Contemporary.

David Grubbs
Records Ruin the Landscape

Tuesday, 12th August 2014, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

John Cage’s disdain for records was legendary. He repeatedly spoke of the ways in which recorded music was antithetical to his work. In this presentation from his book Records Ruin the Landscape: John Cage, the Sixties, and Sound Recording, Grubbs argues that, following Cage, new genres in experimental and avant-garde music in the 1960s (indeterminate music, long-duration minimalism, text scores, happenings, live electronic music, free jazz, and free improvisation) were particularly ill-suited to be represented in the form of a recording. Despite this, present-day listeners are coming to know that era’s experimental music through the recorded artefacts of composers and musicians who largely disavowed recordings.

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David Grubbs is associate professor in the Conservatory of Music at Brooklyn College, CUNY, a contributing editor in music for BOMB Magazine, directs the Blue Chopsticks record label, and serves as a member of ISSUE Project Room’s Board of Directors. His musical career encompasses twelve solo albums, membership of the groups Gastr del Sol, Bastro, and Squirrel Bait, performances with Red Krayola, Will Oldham, Tony Conrad, Pauline Oliveros, and Loren Connors, and cross-disciplinary collaborations with writers Susan Howe and Rick Moody, visual artists Anthony McCall, Angela Bulloch, and Stephen Prina, and choreographer Jonah Bokaer.

Lecture #1 in the series Theories and Histories of Sound presented in conjunction with Liquid Architecture and Gertrude Contemporary and in partnership with Room40.

Helen Johnson
Failing Up: On Painting and Discursive Stupidity

Tuesday, 15th July 2014, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

Wit and stupidity might seem unlikely bedfellows in some senses, but in painting as in philosophy they find common ground. As something of a shamed medium in a post-medium specific context, it might be said that painting is ripe for humour—for Schadenfreude in particular—and its aesthetic inclinations can be co-opted in the service of the joke.

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Building on ideas drawn from Uwe Wirth’s theory of discursive stupidity and the re-situation of genius as the cousin of foolishness, this lecture will outline an argument for wit and stupidity as strategies for painting. This argument is attended by the proposition that a connection can be drawn between the outside-ness of stupidity and the outside-ness of critical distance, and that the point where the two meet is in aesthetic experience, in the meta-cognitive space that constitutes neither thought nor sensation, and which resists an end in understanding. 

Helen Johnson (born 1979) is an artist and writer based in Melbourne. Recent exhibitions include Ex-execs at Minerva, Sydney; Time Enough For Love at Chapter House Lane, Melbourne; Meantime at Sutton Gallery, Melbourne; Mural Problem at Otras Obras, Tijuana; Air to Surface at Prism, Los Angeles; Melbourne Now at the NGV and Collage: The Heide Collection at Heide Museum of Modern Art. She is a regular contributor to Un Magazine and Discipline. She recently completed a PhD at Monash University entitled Critical Form: On Proceeding as a Painter.

Lecture #2 in the 2014 Contemporary Art Lecture Series presented in collaboration with Gertrude Contemporary.

Branden W. Joseph
Art and Dirt: Kim Gordon’s Aesthetics of Impurity

Tuesday, 1st July 2014, 6:00pm
Old Arts Theatre D
University of Melbourne
Free to attend

Before embarking on her path-breaking career as singer and bassist in the band Sonic Youth, Kim Gordon was a key artistic and critical voice in the New York art scene, close to such celebrated figures as Mike Kelley, Dan Graham, John Knight, Robert Longo and Laurie Anderson. Throughout the early 1980s in artist-run publications such as Real Life, ZG, Journal, and FILE, Gordon contributed a series of astute analyses of the artistic practices of these and other figures, as well as of the crossovers between art and music.

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At the same time, she was producing exhibitions and installations under the moniker “Design Office”. In this lecture, Branden W. Joseph, editor of Is It My Body?, a collection of Gordon’s early art writing published this year on Sternberg Press, will discuss the little known range of Gordon’s aesthetic practices and critical views from that time, as well as certain continuations of Gordon’s artistic practice to the present day.

Branden W. Joseph is the Frank Gallipoli Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University. He is the author of several books, including Beyond the Dream Syndicate: Tony Conrad and the Arts after Cage (Zone Books, 2008) and Random Order: Robert Rauschenberg and the Neo-Avant-Garde (MIT Press, 2003), which appeared in French translation on Éditions (SIC). His writings have appeared in Artforum, Bookforum, Art Journal, Critical Inquiry, October, Texte zur Kunst, Parkett and Les Cahiers du musée national d’art moderne, as well as in a number of edited volumes and catalogues. He was a founding editor and is currently editorial board member of Grey Room, a journal of architecture, art, media, and politics published quarterly by the MIT Press since 2000.

Lecture #1 of 2014, presented by the School of Culture and Communication, University of Melbourne, in association with Discipline, Gertrude Contemporary, and Liquid Architecture.

2013
Denise Ferreira da Silva
Black Feminist Poethics – Toward the End of the World (As We Know It) with respondent Vivien Ziherl

Wednesday, 27th November 2013, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

‘What is the intention announced by Black Feminist Critiques?’ asks Professor of Ethics Denise Ferreira da Silva, who will give the eighth Gertrude Contemporary – Discipline: Contemporary Art Lecture.

“Would the Poet’s intention emancipate the Category of Blackness from the scientific and historical ways of knowing which produced it in the first place, which has been the Black Feminist Critic worksite?

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Perhaps Blackness emancipated from science and history would wonder about another praxis and wander away and beyond the World, guiding the Feminist to an imagining of other ways of knowing and doing. From without the World as we know it, gazing at the Horizon of The Thing – where the imagination plays unchained – such a Black Feminist Poethic could expose the whole field of possibilities for knowing and doing.

Towards this End, as a preliminary move, this talk returns to the task some call the critique of representation, with an account that confronts juridical (the authorised total violence of the police and the courts) and economic (the expropriation of total value from indigenous lands and enslaved labour) moments of racial subjugation.”

The Gertrude Contemporary – Discipline: Contemporary Art Lecture Series is a collaboration between Melbourne-based contemporary art journal Discipline and Gertrude Contemporary. The series presents lectures on key concerns, artists and theories of contemporary art.  Throughout 2013 lecturers have spoken from the perspective of a variety of different disciplines — including philosophy, cultural studies, art history and literary studies — as well as from academic and non-academic backgrounds.

Denise Ferreira da Silva is a Professor in Ethics at Queen Mary-University London and currently a Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law at La Trobe University. She approaches Ethics and Political Theory with tools from critical legal theory, historical-materialism, feminist theory, racial and postcolonial/global studies. Her recent publications include: Toward a Global Idea of Race (2007), Notes Towards the End of Time (2013), “No-Bodies: Law, Raciality, Violence” (Griffith Law Review, 2009), “Accumulation, Dispossession and Debt: The Racial Logic of Global Capitalism,” W/ Paula Chackravartty (American Quarterly 2012), and “To be Announced: Radical Praxis (at) the Limits of Justice” (Social Text, 2013).

Vivian Ziherl is a researcher, curator and critic. Since 2011 she has been a Curator at  If I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want to Be Part Of Your Revolution in Amsterdam. Independent projects include “Landings” (Witte de With Centre for Contemporary Art and other partner organizations) and “StageIt!” (Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam). Her writing has appeared in periodicals including e-flux Journal, Scapegoat, Pages Magazine, Frieze, LEAP Magazine, Metropolis M, Discipline, Eyeline and the Journal of Art (Art Association of Australia and New Zealand), among others.

Lecture #8 in the 2013 Contemporary Art Lecture Series presented in collaboration with Gertrude Contemporary.

Sean Dockray
Interface, Access, Loss with respondent Jake Goldenfein

Wednesday, 30th October 2013, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

From peer-to-peer utopianism of a decade ago to the power and data centralising within today’s Internet platforms, Sean Dockray will survey how the structure of digital property has changed over recent years with the growth of “the cloud.”

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Dockray, initiator of knowledge-sharing platforms The Public School and aaaarg.org, will draw on computer science to trace the shifts in online knowledge sharing in what he calls “a dark lecture, written under the cloud’s shadow”, but one that will attempt to gesture toward “cracks in those interfaces that define the seemingly impermeable contours of this new reality.”

The Gertrude Contemporary – Discipline: Contemporary Art Lecture Series is a collaboration between Melbourne based contemporary art journal Discipline and Gertrude Contemporary. The series presents lectures on key concerns, artists and theories of contemporary art. Throughout 2013 lecturers have spoken from the perspective of a variety of different disciplines — including philosophy, cultural studies, art history and literary studies — as well as from academic and non-academic backgrounds.

Sean Dockray is an artist, a founding director of the Los Angeles non-profit Telic Arts Exchange, and initiator of knowledge-sharing platforms The Public School and aaaarg. org. As a research fellow the Post-Media Lab at Leuphana University last year, he explored the physical infrastructure of the sharing economy, focusing on Facebook’s new northern European datacenter. His written essays address topics such as online education (Frieze), the militarization of universities (in Contestations: Learning from Critical Experiments in Education), book scanning (Fillip), traffic control (Cabinet), and radio (Volume).

Jake Goldenfein is a Fellow and PhD candidate at the Centre for Media and Communications Law at Melbourne Law School doing socio-legal research on histories of communication technologies and the legal regimes governing them with a focus on state archives (criminal records, photos and dossiers). He has been a researcher at Melbourne Law School, New York Law School, and The Swinburne Institute for Social Research in the fields of intellectual property, media and communications history and theory, communications policy, privacy and media law. His recent publications cover topics such as police photography, informal media economies, legal accidents, and the history of the archive.

Lecture #7 in the 2013 Contemporary Art Lecture Series presented in collaboration with Gertrude Contemporary.

Documentation…

Listen to the recording of Sean Dockray’s lecture below:

Nikos Papastergiadis
On Friendship

Thursday, 26th September 2013, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

How do we know what we like when it comes to art?

In this lecture, On Friendship, Papastergiadis will consider what role sensory awareness plays in our knowledge of contemporary art. He will argue that the answer to these questions requires more than just looking at art.

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Nikos Papastergiadis is Professor at the School of Culture and Communication and Director of the Research Unit in Public Cultures at the University of Melbourne. His current research focuses on the investigation of the historical transformation of contemporary art and cultural institutions by digital technology. His publications include Modernity as Exile (1993), Dialogues in the Diaspora (1998), The Turbulence of Migration (2000), Metaphor and Tension (2004) Spatial Aesthetics: Art Place and the Everyday (2006), Cosmopolitanism and Culture (2012) as well as being the author of numerous essays which have been translated into over a dozen languages and appeared in major catalogues such as the Biennales of Sydney, Liverpool, Istanbul, Gwanju, Taipei, Lyon, Thessaloniki and Documenta 13.

Lecture #6 in the 2013 Contemporary Art Lecture Series presented in collaboration with Gertrude Contemporary.

Documentation…

Listen to the recording of Nikos Papastergiadis’ lecture below:

Caoimhín Mac Giolla Léith
Words, Names, Places, Beasts and Things followed by a conversation with Rebecca Coates

Tuesday, 27th August 2013, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

Mac Giolla Léith will draw on his research in the fields of Irish-language linguistics and literary criticism to address artworks including Franz Ackermann’s Mental Maps (1991–), Douglas Gordon’s Play Dead. Real Time (2003) and Ceal Floyer’s Things (2009). He will contextualise these works within wider debates surrounding the relationship between words and things and between naming and mapping. The lecture will also consider various questions raised by the resurgence in recent years of a variety of ahumanist forms of thought.

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Caoimhín Mac Giolla Léith is a critic and occasional curator who teaches in the School of Irish, Celtic Studies, Irish Folklore and Linguistics at University College Dublin.  In addition to his writings on literature in the Irish language he has published widely on contemporary art. Among his most recent publications are monographic essays on the work of Douglas Gordon, Annette Kelm, Elad Lassry, Anj Smith, John Stezaker and James Welling.  He is a contributor to Afterall, Artforum, Frieze, Parkett and Tate Etc.  He has curated exhibitions in Dublin, London, Amsterdam and New York and was a juror for the 2005 Turner Prize.

Rebecca Coates is an independent curator and writer, Associate Curator, ACCA, and lecturer in Art History and Art Curatorship, School of Culture and Communications, University of Melbourne.  In 2013 she completed a PhD in the field of exhibition histories.  She has worked extensively as a curator in Australia and overseas, including ACCA, the NGV, and MOMA Oxford, where she curated and developed an extensive program of touring exhibitions and collaborative projects with art spaces and museums in the UK and Europe. She writes regularly for Australian and international art journals and publications.

Lecture #5 in the 2013 Contemporary Art Lecture Series presented in collaboration with Gertrude Contemporary.

Lauren Cornell

Wednesday, 31st July 2013, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

Discipline and Gertrude Contemporary are pleased to announce that New York based curator Lauren Cornell will give the fourth lecture in the Gertrude Contemporary – Discipline: Contemporary Art Lecture Series. Cornell is one of the most innovative curators practising today and is undertaking a curatorial residency at the invitation of Gertrude Contemporary, which has been supported by the Australia Council for the Arts.

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During her talk, Cornell will give a succinct overview of art engaged with the internet, and explore how the vastly accelerated circulation and distribution of contemporary art has facilitated the emergence of new communities, new aesthetics and formal trends and a host of discursive opportunities, and challenges. Cornell will focus on her work with Rhizome, as well as recent exhibitions she has organized, including Free (2010) at the New Museum, and Circulate (2012) at Foam, Amsterdam, and briefly discuss her work as Curator of the Museum as Hub and The 2015 New Museum Triennale.

Formerly Executive Director of Rhizome, Cornell is now Curator of 2015 Triennial (with Ryan Trecartin), Curator of Digital Projects and the Museum as Hub, which is a new model for curatorial practice and institutional collaboration at the New Museum. During her visit to Australia Cornell will be researching for these projects, meeting with artists, galleries and other curators. Her dynamic approach has been recognised internationally and she has co-curated two recent pivotal exhibitions; The Generational: Younger than Jesus, 2009 (co-curated with Massimiliano Gioni and Laura Hoptman) and Free, 2010, both at the New Museum, amongst numerous other exhibitions.

Lecture #4 in the 2013 Contemporary Art Lecture Series presented in collaboration with Gertrude Contemporary.

Justin Clemens
What Do We Talk About When We Talk About Contemporary Art?

Monday, 24th June 2013, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

What do we talk about when we talk about contemporary art? surveys the most important theories of contemporary art – including those by Giorgio Agamben, Alain Badiou, Boris Groys, Jacques Ranciere, various Octoberites and so-called Speculative Realists – in order to point out their strengths and weaknesses, and outline several possible new ways of talking about art. 

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This lecture will coincide with the publication of Clemens’ forthcoming book Psychoanalysis is an Antiphilosophy published by Edinburgh University Press.

Justin Clemens writes extensively on contemporary Australian art and European philosophy. His books include Psychoanalysis is an Antiphilosophy (Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP 2013); Minimal Domination (Melbourne: Surpllus 2011), a collection of writings on art; and, with Dominic Pettman, Avoiding the Subject (Amsterdam: Amsterdam UP 2004). His creative works include the poetry chapbook Me ‘n’ me trumpet (Sydney: Vagabond 2011); the novella Black River (Melbourne: re.press 2007), with collages by Helen Johnson; and the mock-epic poem The Mundiad (Melbourne: Black Inc 2004). He is also the co-editor of collections on and by such major contemporary thinkers as Giorgio Agamben, Alain Badiou, and Jacqueline Rose. He teaches at the University of Melbourne.

Lecture #3 in the 2013 Contemporary Art Lecture Series presented in collaboration with Gertrude Contemporary.

Dr Juliet Rogers
The Trauma of the Political – or, Catch Me I’m Falling (into the Ambivalent Arms of Law) followed by a conversation with Maria Tumarkin

Tuesday, 28th May 2013, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

There is an excitement about falling that betrays itself in images and experiences of the flesh, from Richard Drew’s capture of the Falling Man during September 11, 2001, to climate change activists’ depictions of the psychosis of not believing we will hit the ground, and the suspended nature of the work of William Kentridge. Art and falling go hand in hand, and Rogers suggests, so too does politics.

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We can see the current politics of the liberal democratic, in which sovereign aggression is excused by sovereign care. Where law both pushes the subject into the abyss in the interests of its protection, and where flesh is cut, tortured and even killed as a mode of justice. A contemporary democratic politics that embodies such paradox offers a thin space between the air and the ground, and demands the fantasy of endless capture, for some, and the foreclosure of the possibility that flesh may fall and not be caught.

Dr Juliet Rogers is Faculty Member at the School of Political Sciences, Criminology at the University of Melbourne, and currently an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow undertaking a psychoanalytic examination of the ‘Quality of Remorse’ after periods of political and military conflict. She was formerly a community worker and then a psychotherapist. She turned from this life to work in academia and she has recently been a Visiting Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence, at Yale Law School, Connecticut and at the University of Cape Town Law School, South Africa. Her work is always a melding between psychoanalysis and law, that is, it is always a concern with the limit. She recently published Law’s Cut on the Body of Human Rights: Female Circumcision, Torture and Sacred Flesh which will be out in July with Routledge, and she is currently working on a monograph on Remorse.

Maria Tumarkin is a Melbourne-based writer and cultural historian. She is the author of three acclaimed books of ideas: Traumascapes, Courage and Otherland. Maria’s essays – tackling our culture’s preoccupations and blindspots – have been included in Best Australian Essays 2011 and 2012. Maria holds a PhD in cultural history from the University of Melbourne. She has taught at universities and writing centres, directed video clips, written radio documentaries, contributed catalogue essays for galleries and museums, and forged ongoing collaborations with artists and psychologists. She is a 2013–14 Sidney Myer Creative Fellow.

Lecture #2 in the 2013 Contemporary Art Lecture Series presented in collaboration with Gertrude Contemporary.

Rex Butler
John Nixon: A Communist Artist

Thursday, 11th April 2013, 6:00pm
Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne
Free to attend

Rex Butler’s lecture, John Nixon: A Communist Artist, will examine the work of Melbourne-based abstract artist John Nixon, who has been the subject of much discussion over the past twenty years.

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Nixon has been lauded for continuing the radical experiments of Russian constructivism, criticised for not being truly experimental, and positioned as continuing an avant-garde tradition that somehow brings together the monochrome and the readymade. In this lecture and accompanying paper, published in Discipline No. 3, Rex Butler reads Nixon’s work through the writings of art critic Boris Groys to suggest that it is—of all things—communist. The lecture was a fantastic success, with over 175 attendants and a well-defined critical debate taking place at its conclusion.

Rex Butler teaches in the School of English, Media Studies and Art History at the University of Queensland, specialising in contemporary and Australian art. He is currently working on a book on Deleuze and Guattari’s What is Philosophy?

Lecture #1 in the 2013 Contemporary Art Lecture Series presented in collaboration with Gertrude Contemporary.

2012
Discipline, and Other Sermons

20th June – 7th July 2012
TCB art inc., Melbourne
Free to attend

Discipline, and other sermons is a three-week series of lectures and reading groups on contemporary art, organised by co-editors Nick Croggon and Helen Hughes

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For this event, Discipline will turn the back room at TCB into a pop-up bookstore and meeting space in which to present and debate ideas about contemporary art. (As well as hold some musical performances!) Lectures and performances by Francis Plagne, Ryan Johnston, Justin Clemens, Sarinah Masukor, Tim Alves, James Parker, Moffofarrah, People Person, Scratch Ensemble, Tim Coster and more.

Download the program (PDF)

Publications
Forthcoming
Three Reflections on
Contemporary Art History

Edited by Nicholas Croggon & Helen Hughes, essays by Ian McLean, Amelia Barikin, and Terry Smith.

Three Reflections on Contemporary Art History is the first in a series of publications edited and published by Discipline, the annually published contem­­porary art journal, based in Melbourne, Australia.

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This publication, edited by Nicholas Croggon and Helen Hughes, focuses Discipline’s interest in contemporary art onto the practice of art history itself, including essays by three of the discipline’s leading practitioners: Ian McLean, Amelia Barikin, and Terry Smith. In their essays, McLean, Barikin and Smith reflect on the stakes of a properly contemporary art history: its semantic precursors and philosophical potential, its link to the undead, and ultimately, its necessity.

Available in paperback and eBook editions.

 

2012
S.T. Lore
Institute Zagreb 1986/The Air Of Conquerors

Designed by Annie Wu with images by Joshua Petherick and Nicholas Mangan.

Institute Zagreb 1986/The Air of Conquerors are two new novella-length works of fiction by the Melbourne-based writer S.T. Lore that are presented in a flip novel. The book is the first solo publication by Lore, featuring stories that pivot around characters immersed in scenes of claustrophobia, obsessive archiving, impossible architectures, image-saturation and delusion.

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Institute Zagreb 1986 intertwines two narratives about a religion conceived by a pair of demographic analysts on the rooftop of an abandoned building, and a rock-collecting character named The Saxon. The narrative is collated through a process of uncovering archived audio recordings retained by an ʻexplosion proofʼ telephone. Institute Zagreb 1986 is interspersed with a series of graphic elements created for the publication by Joshua Petherick. The Air of Conquerors is a piece of surreal detective fiction set against a backdrop of the South Australian Desert scattered with ruined Parisian monuments. It chronicles two investigatorsʼ search for a lonely telephone operator who has disappeared into a subterranean hotel. The narrative was written in reference to a series of photographs that were taken by Nicholas Mangan in Paris in November 2011 and sent to the author as part of a project exploring the fictionalisation of images — both historical and the everyday.

Since 2009, Lore has written fictional texts to accompany a number of exhibitions by Melbourne-based artists and curators, including: Christopher LG Hill, Dylan Martorell, Liv Barrett, Nathan Gray, Alex Vivian, Marco Fusinato, A Constructed World/Speech & What Archive, James Deutsher, Gambia Castle/The Reader, Joint Hassles/Harriet Morgan, Helen Hughes, Genevieve Osborn, and Nicholas Mangan. He is also a regular contributor to the Melbourne-based contemporary art journal Discipline, in which he is publishing the serialised novel, Watts’ Tale of Endless Ore — one chapter per issue.

208 pages, 120 × 177 mm, Softcover, B/W, Edition of 1000, ISBN: 978-0-646-57919-1

$20.00 + postage to…

Editions
2014
Discipline Calendar
Discipine_ELP_Calendar_2014_2015

Compiled by Nicholas Croggon, David Homewood and Helen Hughes, designed by Robert Milne and typeset in Churchward Marianna by Joseph Churchward.

Discipline Calendar has been produced as our contribution to Christopher LG Hill’s “Endless Lonely Planet,” Vol. 3, 2014 and includes a selection of Discipline contributors’ birthdays. Calendar dates are from April, 2014 – May, 2015.

A1 poster, 594 × 841 mm (210 × 297mm folded), B/W, Edition of 200

$5.00 + postage to…

2013
We Need Some
Discipline in Here
Discipline_Tote_Bag_2

Designed by James Vinciguerra.
Tote Bag, Edition of 70

Sold Out

Discipline Height Chart
Discipline_ELP_Height_Chart

Compiled by Nicholas Croggon and Helen Hughes, designed by Annie Wu.

Discipline Height Chart has been produced as our contribution to Christopher LG Hill’s “Endless Lonely Planet,” Vol. 2, 2013 and includes a selection of Discipline contributors’ heights.

Foldout poster, 210 × 600 mm, 2 colour, Edition of 500

$5.00 + postage to…

2012
Discipline Contemporary Art Journal Tote Bag
Discipline_Tote_Bag_1

Designed by James Vinciguerra.
Tote Bag, Edition of 50

Sold Out

Discipline A–Z
Discipline_ELP_Alphabet
Compiled by Nicholas Croggon and Helen Hughes, designed by James Grant.

Discipline A–Z has been produced as our contribution to Christopher LG Hill’s “Endless Lonely Planet,” Vol. 1, 2012 and includes letters designed by a selection of Discipline contributors that form a full English alphabet. The letters have been contributed by Sean Bailey, Damiano Bertoli, Matthew Brown, Bazzy Ellison, Fayen d’Evie, James Grant, Nathan Gray, Christopher LG Hill, Helen Hughes, Renee Jaeger, Helen Johnson, Madeline Kidd, Claire Lambe, Dylan Martorell, Jessica McElhinney, Elizabeth Newman, John Nixon, Virginia Overell, Mark Rodda, Antonia Sellbach, Kate Smith, Masato Takasaka, Simon Taylor, Paul Williams, Annie Wu, and Jarrod Zlatic.

Foldout poster, 297 × 420 mm, 2 colour, Edition of 100

$5.00 + postage to…

Information

About

Discipline is a Melbourne-based publisher and contemporary art journal edited by Nicholas Croggon, David Homewood, and Helen Hughes. It has a focus on longer, research-based essays, interviews and artist pages.

While based and published in Melbourne, the writers and artists who have contributed to Discipline are both local and international. In presenting longer-form essays, the journal aims to ground a new body of sustained intellectual writing about contemporary art that does not merely fall back on the crutch of “plurality” as a means for theorising art after postmodernism and globalisation.

Discipline aims to publish highly focused essays that take on, critically and intelligently, the full strength of contemporary artworks, working through their specific concepts, histories, politics and materialities.

Contact

info@discipline.net.au

Distribution

All online payments are processed through PayPal (no account required) and we accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, or PayPal. For ordering enquires please write to order@discipline.net.au

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Colophon

Editors

Nicholas Croggon
David Homewood
Helen Hughes

Guest Editors

Vivian Ziherl (Discipline No. 1)
Maria Fusco (Discipline No. 2)
Raimundas Malašauskas (Discipline No. 3)

Design

Warren Taylor (2011)
Annie Wu & Žiga Testen (2012–2013)
Robert Milne, Rainoff (2014–)

Typeface

Victor, Fabian Harb (2014)

Contributors

Discipline No. 1

An Paenhuysen, Annie Wu, Ash Kilmartin, Ben Kinmont, Bianca Hester, Charlie Sofo, Christian Thompson, Connal Parsley, Damiano Bertoli, David Homewood, Fayen d’Evie, Francis Plagne, Graham Lambkin, Helen Hughes, Helen Johnson, Helen Johnson, Jackson Slattery, Jessica McElhinney, Joaquin Segura, John Nixon, Joshua Petherick, Liang Luscombe & Patrice Sharkey, Marco Fusinato, Matthew Collings, Matthew Griffin, Matthew Lutz-Kinoy, Michael Ashcroft, Mira Gojak, Nicholas Croggon, Nine Yamamoto-Masson, Pataphysics, Pat Foster and Jen Berean, Raafat Ishak, Rebecca Cleman, S.T. Lore, Sarinah Masukor, Slave Pianos, Sriwhana Spong, Stuart Ringholt, Thomas Jeppe, Tom Nicholson, Vivian Ziherl, Warren Taylor, Wolfgang Muller, Yanni Florence

Discipline No. 2

A Constructed World, Adrian Martin, Alex Martinis Roe, Amelia Barikin, Annie Wu, Ash Keating, Bianca Hester, Callum Morton, Christopher LG Hill, Connal Parsley, David Homewood, Elizabeth Newman, Emanuele Coccia, Emily Floyd, Francis Plagne, Helen Hughes, Helen Johnson, James Parker, Janet Burchill, Jemima Wyman, John Berger, John Bevis, Kate Meakin, Kate Warren, Kimberley Dinosaur Tracks, Lip, Maria Fusco, Matt Hinkley, Mira Gojak, Moira Roth, Nicholas Croggon, Nikolaus Gansterer, Nikos Papastergiadis, Omer Fast, Paul Knight, Raquel Ormella, Regrette Etcetera, Robert Rooney, Rongsolo, S.T. Lore, Sandra Selig, Sarinah Masukor, Simon Klose, Simon Reynolds, Steve Salisbury, Terry Smith, Tim Alves, Timothy Morton, Vernon Ah Kee, Vivian Ziherl, Yukultji Napangati, Yve Lomax, Žiga Testen

Discipline No. 3

A Constructed World, Adrian Martin, Alex Vivian, Alicia Frankovich, Anastasia Klose, Andrew McLellan, Angie Keefer, Annie Wu, Anusha Kenny, Ava Carrère, Brook Andrew, Claire Lambe, Dale Hickey, Dan Arps, David Homewood, David Wlazlo, Edith Scob, Elena Narbutaite, Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano, Geoff Newton, Géraldine Longueville, Hany Armanious, Harriet Morgan, Helen Hughes, Helen Johnson, Huw Hallam, Ian Burn, Jan Bryant, Joel Stern, John Nixon, Joris Kritis and Julie Peeters, Juliet Rogers, Justin Andrews, Justin Clemens, Kate Smith, Lauren Berkowitz, Lauren Bliss, Lisa Radford, Maggie Finch, Mattin, Mark Geffriaud, Narelle Jubelin and Jacky Redgate, Nathan Gray, Nicholas Croggon, Nick Selenitsch, Nikos Papastergiadis, Nyapanyapa Yunupingu, Patrick Pound, Quentin Sprague, Raimundas Malašauskas, Rex Butler, Rob McLeish, Simryn Gill, S.T. Lore, Terry Smith, The Mulka Project, Valentina Desideri, Žiga Testen, Zoë Croggon